Is It Possible to Just Watch Disc Golf?

The Mister in action

The Mister in action

When the Mister told me that he was going to participate in a local disc golf mini tournament (only 18 holes) last Saturday, I had to think about whether or not I would photograph the action. After all, the #2 son wasn’t going to play, opting instead to have fun with his buddies at one of their family’s bay house in Galveston.

Sidebar: #2 was very glad the trip was scheduled for Saturday, because he absolutely, positively hates this disc golf course. The very pretty course is tucked between a lake (lost discs) and plenty of out-of-bounds placements (added strokes). While it was the first course he ever played, it’s the one that frustrates him the most. Better for him to be frolicking in the waters of Galveston than getting mad at his dear, sweet, devoted mom when she tries to comfort him after a poor shot.

Eric birdies a tough hole.

Eric birdies a tough hole.

Even though the weather was fine for photography, I decided to take a different spin on the way I looked at the tournament. Too often I get so wrapped up in shooting the action, I don’t really see what’s going on. A player releases the disc, I snap a photo, and then I have absolutely no earthly idea what happened after that. I could easily get clunked in the head, if I’m not careful.

Chuck rears back for a throw along the lake.

Chuck rears back for a throw along the lake.

I decided that especially with #2 not playing, I’d like to just enjoy the pretty park, the players’ banter, and watching the action through both eyes, not just my right one looking through a viewfinder. So I didn’t bring my Nikon D300 and Nikon 105mm lens. (It helped that I knew there would be no flowers to take macro pix of.)

Sudden Sam putts.

Sudden Sam putts.

However, I knew that I couldn’t just watch. I had to have a camera to document some of the goings-on, right? So I opted for my Olympus Stylus Tough 6000. I traded great image quality for convenience and hoped for the best.

Ducks are wary of flying discs.

Ducks are wary of flying discs.

Using the point and shoot camera made me snap fewer pictures (why bother taking a lot of action shots with a camera that isn’t made for that), but it allowed me to look at the tourney in a different way photographically. And without a lot of effort.

Billy sweats in the hot Houston sun.

Billy sweats in the hot Houston sun.

I felt less stress, and I got to enjoy watching the Mister play . . . even though he didn’t particularly enjoy playing due to the heat and the toughness of the course.

Water jets shoot over a swimming pool.

Water jets shoot over a swimming pool.

And, even with the Olympus, I still got to be distracted while shooting disc golf!

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