Knocking the Photographic Rust Off

The #2 son huddles with the team he coaches.

The #2 son huddles with the team he coaches.

Whew, it feels good to toss that crying towel and turn the lights off on that pity party I threw myself in yesterday’s blog. Let’s get back to something real, something important, something photographic . . . like flag football!

The last time I featured flag football photos was back in the spring. Now it’s the fall season when we’re hoping the temps will drop enough to make it actually feel like football season here in the Houston area. The opening games last Sunday had red-hot action that only added to the 85-degree temps. That meant lots of sweating on the sidelines by a certain photographer, who had lots of photographic rust to knock off her flag football-shooting skills.

Even though I had been shooting high school football with my Nikon D300 and Nikon 70-200mm lens (the combination used here), there’s a big difference between the larger stadium field and huge, padded players vs. the smaller flag football field and younger kids.

Flag football is five on five and often resembles a three-ring circus. You have to focus fast to stop the action, which is hard when you have no idea where the ball is going to be thrown (the running plays are much easier to photograph). I trashed plenty of blurred photos that evening—glad I have lots of games to improve!

Caleb runs for yardage.

Caleb runs for yardage.

The #2 son is coaching the same younger-division team (plus two new players) for the third straight season. This time they’ve moved up to the fifth-/sixth-grade group.

Alex tries to evade a flag-puller.

Alex tries to evade a flag-puller.

The good news about the first game of the season? We found out that the team #2 is coaching is da Bears, the team I grew up with back in Chicago. Easy for me to cheer for the Bears! When the kids were the Titans that first season, I just couldn’t muster one, solitary “Go, Titans!” for them. Ugh!

Cayden stops the ball from reaching Alex.

Cayden stops the ball from reaching Alex.

I’d love to report that our little guys notched a win in their opener. But, sadly, they were outplayed by their opponents, who had some taller, more-capable players. Like Cayden, shown above. Look at how he deftly snatches the pass away from our Alex.

Cayden keeps his eyes on the prize.

Cayden keeps his eyes on the prize.

Here Cayden is tipping the ball to himself for the interception.

Christian makes a catch.

Christian makes a catch.

Even our foes’ little guys shone. Look at Christian about to corral a catch.

Nick throws a bullet pass.

Nick throws a bullet pass.

And then there’s Nick, a multisports star, who, when he wasn’t zipping passes to his receivers, was running all over the field.

Fortunately, just like me, our little guys have more games to improve and knock off the flag football-playing rust. Here’s hoping we’re both successful by the end of the season!

One response to “Knocking the Photographic Rust Off

  1. Pingback: Flag football: Then and Now « Random Snippets & Apertures

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