Tag Archives: bee

Creature Feature

Turtle soup

Turtle soup

While I was communing with nature recently, my Nikon 105mm macro lens strayed from the wildflowers. What distracted it? Critters.

First, there were turtles.

Hi, guys!

Hi, guys!

And then a duck joined the party.

A whistling duck

A whistling duck

This feathered friend was fine hanging out by himself on a different part of the lake.

Of course, there’s one critter that always wants to spoil my placid photo party and make me want to shoot and quickly flee.

We both love the bottlebrush bushes.

We both love the beautiful bottlebrush bushes.

Bees! Why does it always have to be bees?

Random Updates

The kid rocks the shower cap!

The kid rocked the shower cap!

Here are several updates about things I’ve mentioned or photos that have been in recent posts:

First, my younger son’s outpatient surgery last Friday was successful. Plus it was the less serious of two possibilities. He has to limit his activity for a week or two, but he should be fine in time for college move-in on August 24.

Remember this tampered sign?

Remember this tampered sign?

The road sign leading into my master-planned community that made us giggle every time we saw it finally has been replaced. We thought it might become a landmark.

Ho-hum

Ho-hum

Now it’s just plain boring.

Keep away!

Keep away!

When I wrote that punny post about the disc golf birdies and the bees, I wondered why the buzzers were so attracted to this spot.

Honey anyone?

Honey anyone?

We found out the next time the Southwest Handicap Mini stopped at the Aquatic Center course. Someone had taken the lid off, exposing what the bees had been building. Intriguing yet still nothing I want to get close to.

The restroom choices at the restaurant. Yes, I had to think about which door to choose.

The restroom choices at the restaurant. Yes, I had to think about which door to choose.

Finally, Team Beowulf went down in flames at the Houston Trivia city finals at Little Woodrow’s last Saturday. The four of us plus Josh put up a valiant effort, but we didn’t advance to state. It didn’t help that not only did we have the youngest team members by far, but I fell ill during the first half and missed three questions when I was in the restroom where I was trying to keep from fainting twice (I think the culprit was dehydration after my morning run).

It’s all for the best, though, because now we can move the kid into his dorm a day earlier, which works better for his roommate’s family. Here’s hoping he’s able to lift boxes by then!

Horticulture Class

Note the pods!

Note the pods!

A recent article in the “Houston Chronicle” informed us that bluebonnets are part of the bean (legume) family. That struck me as odd, because I had never seen pods near our beloved state flower (yes, images from “The Body Snatchers” did just pop into my head!).

Until last Sunday.

It was too nice of a day to stay inside . . . especially if it meant decluttering, which we need to do desperately. So instead the Mister and I (plus my Nikon dSLR and Nikon 105mm macro lens) left my 10-mile comfort radius and made the big drive to Houston. First, we enjoyed lunch at Goode Co. BBQ. When I saw a small patch of bluebonnets across the street, I walked over and snapped the above pic.

Podsapalooza!!

Almost looks patriotic

Almost looks patriotic

Eventually we ended up at TC Jester Park, where I’ve snapped many a disc golf and wildflower photo. The place was brimming with beauty! Bluebonnets were plentiful.

Over and over

Crimson and clover, over and over

As well as bright crimson clovers (anyone else hearing the Tommy James and the Shondells’ song playing in their head?).

Ready for a drink

Ready for a drink

Winecups dotted the scenery.

Ready to dance

Dance time

Plus a few Mexican hats.

Small but mighty

Small but mighty

Tiny flowers added bits of brightness, too.

Naturally, others horned in on my fun.

King of the bluebonnet!

King of the bluebonnet!

I didn’t mind sharing the experience with skippers and butterflies.

Snuggling with an Indian blanket

Snuggling with an Indian blanket

But, as usual, there were too many bees. I know how important they are in nature. However, when they start chasing me away, I can almost hear them taunting me as they buzz . . .

Part of nature’s cycle

Please bee nice

“Class dismissed!”

Painting a Prettier Wildflower Picture

Note the treasures among the bluebonnets: Indian blankets plus a bee!

Note the treasures among the bluebonnets: Indian blankets plus a bee!

As much as I’ve truly enjoyed chasing after our beautiful Texas wildflowers, I can’t help but think how nice it would be if my favorites bloomed within my comfy 10-mile radius.

While I love looking at the throngs of bluebonnets and occasional (for now) Indian blankets a mere mile from my door, I yearn for more variety like I’ve seen along our state’s highways and in small towns. In particular? Indian paintbrush.

As a matter of fact, I was contemplating how happy I would be if I saw a patch or two of orange during my eight-mile walk last Sunday in my neighboring master-planned community. I was coming around a newer section of its walking path when . . . .

Holy cow!

Holy cow!

This popped into view!

Not a lot but a good start

Not a lot but a good start

There standing tall before me was a small section of Indian paintbrush, the first time I’d seen this wildflower so close to home. I was thrilled!

But then I got greedy.

I started thinking of how much I love seeing that awesome orange melding with the bluebonnets. Wouldn’t it be great to see that during my journey?

Be still, my beating heart!

Be still, my beating heart!

And it was! As I continued walking along the path, I saw a small stretch of the very mix I desired. I just about shouted with joy . . . so, of course, a runner suddenly came towards me looking quizzical. I pretended I was just singing along with a song on my iPod Shuffle until he disappeared.

Whew! Temporarily dodged a “she’s crazy” bullet!!

I’m going to eagerly watch this area to see how it fills in.

Another bluebonnet fan

Another bluebonnet fan

I’ll bet the bees feel the same!

Insect Photo Preferences

A butterfly enjoys the horsemint.

Butterflies warm my heart when I’m shooting wildflowers. I love seeing them.

A bee is on the go.

As for bees?

Zeroing in on a blossom.

They definitely speed up my heart rate!

Nature’s Freeloaders

A monarch looks for the perfect horsemint to land on.

During my latest photowalk last Sunday, I made a discovery:

A bee poses.

It’s not just bees and butterflies that like wildflowers as much as I do.

Can you “spot” the bugs (one is hiding)?

Bugs enjoy the flower-power scene, too.

Are you bugging me?

It’s a treat when I lean in close with my Nikon 105mm macro lens to see something looking back at me, especially if it doesn’t have a stinger attached.

Wonder what these guys are.

I guess they’re just nature lovers, too!

One-Word Letter Wednesday

A bee enjoys a mealy blue sage on Texas State’s campus.

B!

The wildflowers also attract a butterfly.