Tag Archives: butterfly bush

Another Very Hungry Caterpillar Tale

Nom nom!

Nom nom!

While I was still mourning the loss of our three caterpillars, nature decided to teach me another lesson.

A couple weeks ago I noticed that our thoroughly devoured butterfly bush had regrown its leaves. The very next day we had yet another temporary visitor chewing away—yep, it was a monarch caterpillar!

The pickings got slim in a hurry.

The pickings got slim in a hurry.

This time there was no competition for all that tasty greenery. I’m sure the little guy preferred being a solo act.

Part of its bar routine

Part of his bar routine

Plus it left plenty of room for the caterpillar to show off his gymnastics skills. This multicolored guy totally entertained me with his stunts around the once-again naked plant.

But all too soon my pal disappeared into the mulch. I wondered if he would be able to find our house so he could eventually pupate.

Not a good place to be

Not a good place to be

The next morning I finally spotted him near our front door, inching his way up the door jamb. That definitely wasn’t the best spot for him to eventually “J” and form his chrysalis.

Caterpillar on a stick

Moving day

So I found a stick, which he climbed on to. Then I gently placed him at the bottom of our front porch’s wall so he could ascend undisturbed.

Two’s company

Two’s company

Before long he was on top of our front entry’s arch, settling in near one of the asps’ cocoons.

Hanging by a thread

Hanging by a thread

By the afternoon, the caterpillar was precariously hanging off the arch. Pupation awaited!

Success . . . for awhile

Success . . . for awhile

When I checked the next morning, this chrysalis greeted me. As happy as I was that we might see another monarch butterfly emerge, I wondered if it would last for two weeks. The location of the bright, green exoskeleton seemed too out in the open, too tempting for hungry birds.

Sure enough, the very next day, there was nothing left of the leaf-stripping, hard-working caterpillar. The chrysalis was gone.

And, once again, I’m in mourning. Sigh!

Welcome Back!

A new cutie

A new cutie

Apparently our butterfly bush isn’t attractive to just monarch caterpillars.

Yesterday when I looked at the plant from the front door, I was surprised to see a little dragonfly hanging on for dear life amid the wind gusts. Of course, that meant I had to grab my Nikon dSLR and snap a bunch of photos before it flew off.

Love the big red eyes and blue nose!

Love the big red eyes and blue nose!

It’s been a couple years since we’ve had any dragonflies in the front yard, and I’ve really missed them. I hope this means that I’ll see them more often. Especially now that the butterfly bush’s leaves have been stripped bare once again.

The “welcome” sign has been turned on!

A New Twist On an Old Children’s Tale

Our beautiful butterfly bush a week ago

Our beautiful butterfly bush a week ago

One of our favorite books to read to our boys back in the day was “The Very Hungry Caterpillar.” Oh, how our sons loved turning each colorful page, wonderfully written and illustrated by Eric Carle, to see what the the critter was up to . . . and eating . . . next! It was a family classic.

Little did I realize that a dozen or so years later that we would be living out our very own version of that cute story. But we had to rename it.

Hi, guys!

Hi, guys!

We call our tale, “The Very Voracious Caterpillars . . . Plus Tiny.” The plot is simple: First, we had lovely blooms on the butterfly bush in our front yard.

Munch munch!

Munch munch!

Then last Monday, I noticed two monarch caterpillars slowly but surely eating up the plant. Of course, that’s what it’s for: To eventually grow butterflies.

Welcome to the family, little guy!

Welcome to the family, little guy!

The next day Tiny, the smallest caterpillar I’ve ever seen, joined the group on the vegetation. Unfortunately, for him, there was no way he could out-eat his jumbo brethren.

The trio

The trio

The other two hogs kept growing larger, while Tiny, well, he kept his petite figure.

Gnawing on the bone

Gnawing on the bone

By last Wednesday morning, the plant was stripped bare. Plus one of the big guys had wandered away. All that was left was one still-voracious caterpillar and Tiny.

A thorny situation

A thorny situation

So the big guy inched his way over to a nearby rose bush, while Tiny got lost in the mulch.

The bare butterfly bush

The bare butterfly bush

Unlike the Carle version, our yarn doesn’t have a happy ending . . . yet. I lost track of the big guy and Tiny and haven’t seen any of the three hanging off the house or forming chrysalises.

But I remain hopeful that one of these days a gorgeous monarch butterfly will flit my way and wave hello . . . and good-bye.