Tag Archives: camera

Camera+ Clouds

The Camera+ caption says it all.

I always get a window seat when I fly, because I love taking photos of clouds. Last Thursday when I traveled to Chicago to visit my family and attend my high school reunion, I decided to change up my photographic cloud game: This time I used my iPhone 4 and the wonderful photo app, Camera+.

Yep, the wing WAS in the way!

What’s handy about Camera+ is that if you put a border around your photo (and who wouldn’t want to do that?), you can add a caption. That definitely helps you remember details about the picture, which is especially handy for those of us who are getting, shall we say, a tad forgetful as we near age 60.

They're so fluffy (name that movie!)!

I’d say both the iPhone 4 and Camera+ did a great job up in the air. They almost made me forget that I don’t like flying. Unfortunately, I’m not quite that forgetful!

Dynamic Reflections

Our local park offers wonderful reflections.

After I finished my walk around my community last Saturday morning, I checked out a few pics I had clicked with my trusty trekking companion, my iPhone 4.

The park’s trees look great in and out of the water.

As I fancied them up a bit using the Camera+ app, I liked how they accurately showed what I had seen that morning. The reflections were simply beautiful.

But then I got curious about using a different Camera+ setting—HDR. High dynamic range imaging ramps up the contrast such that the colors and texture you see in real life aren’t accurately represented in your photo.

The HDR version of my favorite bridge and gazebo in our park.

Usually I don’t like how HDR pics look more like paintings than photos. They often seem too fake.

The HDRed trees really stand out!

But these I really like! Maybe reflections are just meant to be more dynamic.

Is It Really Friday?

The Camera+ app turns an ordinary iPhone 4 photo into something special.

Here’s my goal for today: Remember that it’s actually Friday.

Starting a week with Memorial Day (as in “no school”) always throws off my schedule. But add to it that yesterday was the last day of high school for my younger son (goodbye, sophomore year!), and I’m completely lost. I kept thinking that yesterday was Friday, so, of course, I woke up believing that today is Saturday.

I don’t write a blog post on Saturdays (or Sundays). Glad I actually looked at a calendar to see what day it really is!

My older son starts summer school Monday at our local junior college (two classes the first five-week term and one class the second), so I hope I have my internal calendar back in sync by then!

By the way, the accompanying photo has absolutely nothing to do with this blog post. I just liked how the Camera+ app changed what was a basic, blah photo into something that looked cool. Cool—something we could use right now with the heat blasting the Houston area. Oh, and rain, too.

No matter what day it is!

Photo Friday: The “Perfect” Camera for Gift-Giving

 

Nikon D40

Nikon D40

My friend Kim asked me for advice: What kind of camera should she buy for her teenager’s birthday present? With Mother’s Day Sunday and graduation and Father’s Day around the corner, let’s ponder a key question: Is there a “perfect” camera for moms, dads, grads, and anyone having a birthday?

Of course, the answer is no. There’s no perfect camera for everyone, but there are excellent solutions. First, let’s talk category: Point and shoot, fixed zoom, and digital SLR (interchangeable lenses).

Nikon Coolpix S230 point and shoot

Nikon Coolpix S230 point and shoot

Point and shoots: There are lots of good ones, and they’re very-capable cameras if you’re not shooting action. Definitely the handiest of all the camera categories due to their size but also limited in their capabilities for the same reason. You can’t go wrong with just about any manufacturer’s P&S.

Canon Powershot G10

Canon Powershot G10

Nikon Coolpix P90

Nikon Coolpix P90

 

Fixed zoom: These compact digicams, which Digital Photography Review likes to call “enthusiast cameras,” are a big step up from the lower-end point and shoots. This category includes the Canon Powershot G10 and the Nikon Coolpix P90. They’re more expensive than a conventional P&S ($400-$500), and they can do almost as much as a dSLR. Almost. With their multiple settings (auto, manual, etc.), plenty of megapixels (at least 10), and a good zoom, they’re a great choice for an amateur photographer who wants to do more than just point and shoot. Plus they’re a natural progression for anyone who wants to eventually move up to a dSLR and lessen that more-complicated camera’s learning curve.

Canon Rebel XS

Canon Rebel XS

Digital SLR: Finally, there are the big kahunas, the top of the digital camera food chain: the digital SLRs. Every dSLR, from the least-expensive consumer model to the too-expensive-for-the-likes-of-us pro version, gives photographers great versality and potentially great results. The ability to change lenses from, say, a 50mm prime to a 70-200mm zoom enables you to get the most out of your photography and capture that terrific photo. And the consumer dSLRs, like the Nikon D40 and the Canon Rebel XS, cost just a little more than the fixed zoom digicams at $500-$600, which includes the low-end 18-55mm lens. They can be used on automatic or program while the confidence is building to get more hands-on.

You’ll notice that I’ve only mentioned Canon and Nikon for two of the three categories. That’s because I think they make the best fixed zoom cameras and dSLRs. Which one is better? That’s like the ubiquitous Mac vs. PC debate! The one that’s better is the one that you’ll use a lot! I started with a Nikon D70, because my buddy Deanna had bought one and let me use it. I fell in love with its ease of use (it helps that I have a film SLR background), bought one immediately, and have followed a Nikon upgrade path ever since (moving on to the Nikon D200 and then to my current D300). I have plenty of friends who have been happy with their Canon dSLRs, too. The best advice is to go to a store where you can hold both cameras; one may feel better in your hands than the other.

I’m told all the time that I’m a good photographer because my camera equipment is so good. Nice of people to discount almost 40 years of SLR experience! It’s almost a conundrum: Yes, the photographer needs to have good skills, but it’s almost impossible to take great photos with substandard or the wrong equipment. Tonight I’m going to be shooting an indoor dance show at the #1 son’s high school; I’d hate to try to tell its story with a point and shoot instead of my D300 and my Nikon 85mm f/1.4 lens. Good photography truly takes good skills and the right equipment.

What’s most important in buying a camera is getting one that you’ll use. The more you use it, the more proficient you’ll become. Experience is so important in getting top-notch photos. You don’t want to reinvent the wheel every time you pick up your camera.

My answer to Kim is to have her daughter kick in some birthday money and buy a digital SLR. It will give her maximum flexibility and growth, putting her on the road to a rewarding, lifetime photography experience. As for which dSLR, Canon or Nikon, beginner or mid-range? Go to the store and check ’em out—one might just feel perfect!

Speaking of Mother’s Day

Happy Mother’s Day to all the moms; hope you have a wonderful Sunday that includes either taking pictures or having your picture taken, no matter what camera is used!