Tag Archives: Eric J.

Discin’ in Huntsville

You can see a basket just past the trees on the left.

You can see a basket just past the trees on the left.

A lot of times wherever we go, we just happen to find disc golf courses.

Well, especially when the Mister decides we need to find them!

The kid and the Mister tee off at hole 1.

The kid and the Mister tee off at hole 1.

Last Sunday when we visited our younger son and his roommate, RJ, at SHSU, we walked off some of those Chili’s calories by throwing the Mister’s discs at a local course. And when I say “we,” of course, I mean them.

Hey, someone has to snap photos!

The kid advises the novice.

The kid advises the novice.

RJ doesn’t play disc golf, but that didn’t stop my son from trying to indoctrinate him into his favorite sport. It would be nice to have some company when he decides to practice.

Lots of rusty chains on the baskets

Lots of rusty chains on the baskets

Our disc golf pal Eric had told us about a nine-hole course at Huntsville’s Eastham-Thomason Park, which is pretty close to the boys’ on-campus dorm. Thanks to the Garmin, we easily found it. The kid’s bag was in his room, but he still enjoyed tossing the plastic again.

Looks like the advice worked!

Looks like the advice worked!

RJ’s a good athlete, so he started to get the hang of throwing after awhile. All he needs is lots of practice and continued help from his roomie.

How low can you go?

How low can you go?

The course was typical of ones that are shoehorned into parks. The above basket was almost on the ground, probably to discourage players from flinging their discs into the creek behind it. A spray park and walking path raised the possibility of hitting innocent people.

Fishing for a disc

Fishing for a disc in a different part of the creek

Still, a disc golf course within a mile or so of his new home is important for my son. It gives him a great outlet for releasing the stress of studying (and I sincerely hope I’m not making an assumption that he actually is studying!), as well as a way to sharpen his skills.

Here’s hoping he doesn’t bean someone in the noggin’!

Rainy Day Players and Photographers

My younger son lasers in his birdie putt amid the raindrops.

My younger son lasers in his birdie putt amid the raindrops.

According to the Southwest Handicap Mini’s fearless leader, Eric, it should never rain on Tuesdays during the 18-hole disc golf tournaments. So we were all surprised when Mother Nature had the audacity to defy Eric and briefly dump some drops on our heads during this week’s contest at Community Park in Missouri City.

Mike keeps the basket in his sights.

Mike keeps the basket in his sights.

As much as I don’t like getting my photographic equipment wet, I went with the flow (literally) and just kept on shooting while hoping for the best. When I looked at my pics in Photoshop later, I loved how my fast shutter speed had captured not only the action but also the rain.

Glen hams it up with his no-look putt.

Glen hams it up with his no-look putt.

Talk about your spray and pray!

Elementary Trivial Pursuit

We’re ready to play!

We’re ready to play!

Part of our family fun time lately has been playing trivia Friday nights at Buffalo Wild Wings. It started when we helped out our disc golf pal Eric’s team and then evolved into my younger son wanting to start our own squad. He dubbed us “Team Beowulf.”

We really have a great time trying to figure out the answers together. We’re all able to contribute. There’s one problem, though, with Beowulf: We’re either too old or too young; we don’t have one or two people in the middle who can help out with the questions we always fall down on . . . like 1990s music (the bane of our trivial existence).

We cringe whenever we hear that an upcoming category is “music” or “lost lyrics.” Most of the time we have utterly no idea what to answer.

You know what “C” is for!

You know what “C” is for!

Why isn’t 1990s music in our wheelhouse? That’s when we had our sons! We were busy listening to “Wheels on the Bus,” Barney’s classic “I Love You,” and the iconic “C Is for Cookie,” not . . . well, quite honestly, I can’t name one artist or group from that decade. I’m proud to say that I’m forever stuck from 1963-1975 when it comes to the songs I enjoy.

As well as those from when the boys were little. I guess we need to suggest to the trivia types to ask questions about 1990s young music . . . as in very young.

But until we recruit someone who was born in the 1970s or early ’80s, we’re stuck with our usual prayer just before the weekly music question is asked:

“Please be from the 1950s (the Mister’s fave), ’60s, or early ’70s! Or something Cookie Monster sings!!”