Tag Archives: Nikon S6200

Five for Five

Sunflowers brighten the view.

Gotta love the yellow.

Last Sunday morning during my five-mile walk in our neighboring master-planned community, several sights moved me to snap pics with my Nikon S6200.

Let’s call it five miles, five photos. I started off with the sunflowers, which finally are blooming everywhere this month.

Do you see what I see?

Do you see what I see?

Next there was this rabbit trying to hide in the grass. I usually see at least a half-dozen bunnies during my walk.

Looking a little blue

Looking a little blue

This odd-colored catfish caught my eye. For some reason it was lazing around near the lake’s shore.

Refreshing!

Refreshing!

The best friend of a walker/runner during Houston’s notoriously steamy summers? Sprinklers! I doused myself in one of them after I captured the scene.

Pretty in pink

Pretty in pink

Near the end of my journey, these purty petals almost blocked my way along the sidewalk back home. I think they wanted to be included in this post.

And so they are!

Beauty and the Beast Poetry

Purply agapantha buds spill forth.

Purply agapanthus buds spill forth.

So lovely to behold!

A probable water moccasin is scary in a nearby lake.

A probable water moccasin looks scary in a nearby lake.

But this is not, the truth be told!!

Sidebar: Photos snapped with my Nikon S6200 point and shoot.

Apt Illustration

Thanks for posing, guys!

Thanks for posing, guys!

Talk about having your ducks in a row!

That didn’t last long. (Nikon S6200)

That didn’t last long. (Nikon S6200)

Or not.

A Wild Fish Tale

My Nikon S6200 captures the startling scene.

My Nikon S6200 captures the startling scene.

It started with a loud splash. Followed by a bright orange flash.

Immediately, my attention was drawn from the wildflowers along my walk last Saturday to the lake. Were those gigantic goldfish grappling with one another close to the shore in my neighboring master-planned community? Perhaps they were Magikarp, the fish Pokémon . . . which could mean that Ash Ketchum and Misty were close by.

I jogged to the edge of the lake and quickly pulled out my Nikon S6200. About half a dozen huge fish were struggling so near me that I could look them in the eyes!

This reminds me of unruly preschoolers.

This reminds me of unruly preschoolers.

In fact, I could almost hear them calling out. I had never seen anything like this before. It was amazing!

Are you looking at me?

Are you looking at me?

I cut my four-miler short and jogged home to grab my Nikon D700 and Nikon 105mm macro lens. Then I drove back and looked for bursts of electric orange. There were several places along the long lake’s shore where I saw activity.

Always travel with buddies.

Always travel with buddies.

As I snapped away . . . and as the fish got close enough to actually splash me . . . a guy walking along the shore told me that they were koi. What were the big critters doing? Spawning.

A koi sandwich

A koi sandwich

In early spring, the male koi sandwich the female and start bumping her. This forces out the thousands of eggs in her body, which then allows the guys to fertilize them. From what I saw, it’s a brutal process involving a lot of thrashing, crashing, and mashing.

This looks uncomfortable.

This looks uncomfortable for the gal in the middle.

The overgrown goldfish attracted attention from just about everyone on the walking path. Privacy was not an issue for them!

Not-so-coy koi

The gang’s all here.

Yep, when it comes to spawning, these koi aren’t so coy!

One-Word Wednesday

A family suns itself along the creek in my community. (Nikon S6200)

A family hangs out along the creek in my community. (Nikon S6200)

Turtles!

My Favorite Blog Photos, Part I

This double reflection looks like I used a sepia filter (but I didn’t).

This double reflection looks like I used a sepia filter (but I didn’t). (iPhone)

Obviously, I like sharing . . . or is that oversharing . . . photos. Such is the life of a blogger who also is a photographer. I’ve been looking through my 2012 pics the last week or so for a personal planner that I’m making through Blurb.com (hope I actually finish it before January ends!), and I thought I would share some of my favorites. Today’s post features January (which includes the above reflective photo—love those reflections!) through June. Enjoy!

Sidebar: Unless otherwise noted, photos were snapped with my Nikon D700.

January

My sons and Tanner enjoy watching their video.

My sons and Tanner enjoy watching their video.

February

An ibis enjoys the water along the shore. (Nikon S6200)

An ibis walks along the shore. (Nikon S6200)

That’s more like it!

My younger son smiles.

March

Thistle pollen covers the bee.

Thistle pollen covers a bee.

Loads of bluebonnets . . . love ’em!

Loads of bluebonnets . . . love ’em!

April

Purple is a popular color for wildflowers.

Purple is a popular color for wildflowers. Even flies like them.

A monarch looks for the perfect horsemint to land on.

A monarch looks for the perfect horsemint to land on.

May

It’s a bird . . . it’s a plane . . . it’s the super moon!

It’s a bird . . . it’s a plane . . . no, it’s the supermoon! (Nikon D300)

A green dragonfly tries to blend in with his surroundings.

A green dragonfly tries to blend in with his surroundings.

June

Love those thistles.

More bee-thistle action

I shot these strawflowers during my Chicago trip.

I shot these sensational strawflowers during my Chicago visit.

Look for part two Thursday!

The Bird is the Word

An egret rests on a sinking canoe. (Nikon S6200)

Photo life isn’t just about bluebonnets and azaleas, you know.

An ibis enjoys the water along the shore. (Nikon S6200)

There are plenty of birds in our area to also compete for my photographic attention. The first two pix were snapped with my Nikon S6200, the point-and-shoot digicam I carry when I’m walking or jogging.

I’m really glad I had it when I saw the egret on the canoe last Sunday morning. When I returned later that day with my Nikon dSLRs to take photos of the flora, the bird, of course, had flown the coop boat.

Ibises hunt for food across the lake. (Nikon D300)

That’s the problem with shooting wildlife vs. wildflowers—the former moves, sometimes very quickly. One minute you’ve barely got them in range . . . .

Soaring above the lake (Nikon D300)

And the next minute? See ya later, ibis-gator!